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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • [Since entering a comment at the other site requires entering an "anti-spam word" but there are no instructions for that, I am entering my comment here at use.perl.org.]

    Gabor wrote: "[b]usinesses often do not, or cannot, invest the time and effort to track a continually-moving target like Parrot."

    I don't think this is a fair criticism. I wouldn't expect any profit-constrained business to track any alpha software -- which Parrot clearly is at this point. Parrot's current version is 0.4.15 and the developers have a clear idea of what constitutes, say, 0.5.0 and 1.0. Once we get to 1.0, then it becomes plausible to ask the developers to distinguish between 'stable' versions -- which businesses would presumably track -- and 'development' versions.

    • Yeah, but isn’t that the point? Parrot’s still alpha – fair enough –, but it’s been in the works for six years already. When is it going to get to 1.0?

      I’m not sure it’s a good argument – much depends on how much work has really been invested in those six years, and how quickly the project will settle once the groundwork has been laid down. But it’s a valid question.

      Btw, it wasn’t Gabor who wrote that article, he merely linked it.

      • When is it going to get to 1.0?

        When there are enough patches to add sufficient features and test and documentation and remove sufficient bugs to get to 1.0.

        The Cost is fixed, so the only two knobs to adjust are Time and Scope.