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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • So we didn't lose, Mojo lost - but we didn't win, so Mojo won. I'm confused.

    Should be noted that it seemed like you were more inclined to use "set" in your code when you could have just changed the configuration file (as is shown in the docs):

    template: "template_toolkit"
    engines:
        template_toolkit:
            start_tag: '[%'
            stop_tag:  '%]'

    (taken directly from the POD)

    P.S.

    We're actually working on creating a CPAN distribution-like directories.

    • Mojo is winning on the cumulative result over all weeks so far, but did not pull ahead.

      As you'll see from the code checkout, my application does not have a config file.

      This also isn't really the kind of thing you'd want in a config file, it's an inherent part of the application. You aren't going to change it on one particular machine compared to another machine.

      • by xsawyerx (8978) on 2010.04.14 19:17 (#71895) Journal

        Mojo is winning on the cumulative result over all weeks so far, but did not pull ahead.

        Positive and negative comparisons are a matter of semantic. Every "win" is a "loss for the opponent". Suckless can say "we write good programs", instead they decided to say "We write programs that don't suck as much as the others."

        However, even though you disliked a certain feature of Mojo, and disliked it more than you liked the way it is in Dancer - you still awarded no points to Dancer. Kinda sucked, but oh well, maybe we can change the name of Dancer to "Not Mojo". :)

        This also isn't really the kind of thing you'd want in a config file, it's an inherent part of the application. You aren't going to change it on one particular machine compared to another machine.

        Configuration files aren't just things that change across machines. They are also a nice way of getting some code out of your application and into a bit of a cleaner text. Especially when you can write them more succinctly than in code. The TT tags are a good example of that, IMHO.

        • Code in your configuration is still code, now it's just in a different language and mixed into your real configuration data in a place that is further away from the other code, making it harder to maintain.

          I don't want to put anything into a config file that I wouldn't expect a non-Perl programmer sysadmin to potentially change.

          • I don't want to put anything into a config file that I wouldn't expect a non-Perl programmer sysadmin to potentially change.

            You've got a point there. Fair enough. :)