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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • [This is probably worthy of a journal post on its own.]

    I've been really shocked to see how times have changed in the speaking arena. Perhaps it's related to the .com bust, but conferences have stopped paying as much to speakers as they once have.

    Now, it's one thing when you're an open source community that's putting together the conference (i.e. YAPC), but when it's a commercial entity (i.e. SIGS, O'Reilly, etc.) who will be charging a whole lot for the conference pass and make more money off of sponsorships, etc ... then they should be able to pay the speakers more.

    Back in the heyday, when I was speaking for SIGS, they would pay for everything. Airfare, ground transportation, hotels for all conference nights, meals, conf. fee and oh yeah, an honorarium.

    Jump to today. For EuroOscon, the only way to get any money out of speaking is doing a half-day tutorial (or more). Simple hour-long talks just get the registration waived. And even if I were able to do a half-day tutorial, I'd still be on the hook (depending on their honorarium).

    Now I know for EuroOscon (and ApacheCon/EU), that might make more sense -- flying Americans over to Europe is more expensive.

    Anyway, all this to say: count me out for EuroOscon -- just not worth it. And in general, speaking at conferences is becoming less worth it... methinks the conference organizers are maximizing their profits at the expense of their speakers (who are the folks that are really responsible for the success of a conference).

    - Jason
    • Nat may be along shortly to give more details, but in my experience, it's not maximizing profits, it's trying to make a profit. Sure, no speakers no conference, but no profit from a conference this year no conference next year.

    • I've been really shocked to see how times have changed in the speaking arena. Perhaps it's related to the .com bust, but conferences have stopped paying as much to speakers as they once have.

      That may be true of other conferences but, as far as I know, OSCON has always paid speakers in the same way (although the amounts may have changed).

      Jump to today. For EuroOscon, the only way to get any money out of speaking is doing a half-day tutorial (or more). Simple hour-long talks just get the registratio