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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • For the record, I've been developing database-backed apps for over a decade. I've used a variety of commercial RDBMSes, including some embedded databases, as well as low-grade hacks: text files, CSV, DBM and the like.

    One feature I cannot seem to live without is the ability to do complex subselects and joins. It's a thorn in my side when I can't do this with MySQL, but somehow I manage to not need it when I'm hacking with MySQL. Another favorite feature of mine is the ability to create and query against

    • Both offer row locking

      Actually, PostgreSQL implements a solution called "Multi Version Concurrency Control" or MVCC, which is billed as "better than row-level locking." This is even more advanced that what Oracle uses, although I would not expect that gap to stay open long.

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
      • MVCC is exactly the same as what Oracle uses.
        • Um, not according to my O'Reilly Oracle 8, 8i, and 9 Essentials book which describes row locking in great detail. Google for some combination of PostgreSQL, better than row-level locking, and MVCC for their claims that they have it and Oracle doesn't.

          Poking around oracle.com with google, I see this [oracle.com], which suggests MVCC for queries, but I believe PostgreSQL uses it for all aspects of a transaction, including DML as well. MVCC replaces row-level locking, so I wouldn't expect to see references to row-level locking in a system that used it. I suppose they might have some way of configuring the database to use one or the other, but I don't seem to see that implied.

          But I'm open to being told I've completely misunderstood. :D

          --
          J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers