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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I guess the 'r' acts as a syllable itself, though. "errrrrh"

    I wonder what all in English is difficult for non-English speakers. I'm sure the 'r' sound is, for one, as that seems to differ in a lot of languages (English (even American vs. British can be different), French (who sometimes approximate English 'r' with a 'w'), German (trills), Spanish (like a soft 'd'), Czech ("rzh" as in Dvorak), Chinese (a mixture of l and r) that I can think of all have different 'r' sounds).

    • German (trills)

      Rather guttural [ʀ] most of the time, or [ɐ] at the end of syllables. Russian's got trills.

      Chinese (a mixture of l and r)

      r in Standard Chinese is not like l at all. It is pronounced like [ɻ], or sometimes [ʐ] at the beginning of a syllable, and has to be carefully learned. [Illustration [wfu.edu]]