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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I agree with most of what you say, but there's one thing you said that really jumps out at me:

    If you take Joel's argument at face value (and that's all it is, a philosophical statement devoid of data or a provable hypothesis), and look back 10-15 years ago, you'll find you have an argument in favor of the status quo: large, mission critical apps running on DOS/Win3.11 + Netware, written in dBase, FoxPro, Clipper, or their ilk. These tools were simply not up to the job, yet as demonstrated by countless unnamed "enterprise" projects, they were suitable for any big enterprisey project.

    Where is it that you worked 10-15 years ago that these tools were regarded as suitable for big enterprisey projects?

    Where I worked, in 1991-1996, only maverick grass roots kinds of organizations proposed these tools for large enterprise projects. They typically tried to scale up their successes with Departmental level apps using this kind of technology, usually against the objection and resistance of centralized IT departments.

    Enterprise projects in those days were typically done with Mainframes and green-screens, or maybe Unix/VMS systems with Oracle/Sybase databases, but not with PCs.

    • Where is it that you worked 10-15 years ago that these tools were regarded as suitable for big enterprisey projects?

      A couple of places, actually. xBase was an acceptable platform in small business for records management and billing; I saw it used frequently in medical offices. But the projects I remember most were in finance, where these systems were managing multi-million dollar positions. These were also systems that were sold to multiple clients, in multiple banking centers around the world.

      I