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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I have recorded my hours for many years, I have had some breaks when things was running smoothly, but believe me, the days where long in periods and the longs days where not always as much fun as could be.

    Today I keep one sets of records, which can be divided into two parts. One is for my consulting business where the hours are recorded to be billed to the client. The other is hours spent on internal product development. This latter is quite interesting to us since we do this to see how we are doing compared to our estimates.

    I have been in a situation similar to yours, plenty of journal entries on that prior to becoming a self-employed. So if you ask me the hours is not the problem, but micro-management is.

    Micro-management is a invasion of privacy and in my opinion a awful way of regarding employees as resources instead of people.

    I ended up in a situation where I saw no other way, but to quit in order to address my stress problems. So I quit without having a job on my hands, on the crazy idea that I would go self-employed.

    I often hire other freelancers etc. to help me out and even though I am interested in data on their estimates, progress and work, I am very careful not to invade their privacy.

    The project manager of the project/job I left in anger actually gave a presentation where he concluded that you 15 minutes each day to talk to your colleagues.

    This sort of work environment is not particularly welcoming to creativity, co-operation, pair-programming and openness about work.