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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I don't think you can compare european and north-american politics in terms of "left" and "right". For example, in the USA, everyone seems to find normal the statement "God bless America", or that a president alludes in public to his religious beliefs. In France, even the ultra-far-right representatives avoid doing this (in public at least), because this would be felt as a direct attack against the Republic. -- Idem for the problem of racial segregation, which is often tied to immigration in Europe, not in
    • exactly - there is only right of centre in america - if you compare it to europe or japan.

      The UK never had deliberate policies of racial segregation - some pubs used to have 'no dogs, no irish, no blacks' but that was a long time ago and never an official or even popular policy.

      Britain and europe never really had a culture of slavery - they benefitted greatly from slavery elswhere and through the slave trade but a lot less than the United States, where slavery was a major part of its economy and culture

      --

      @JAPH = qw(Hacker Perl Another Just);
      print reverse @JAPH;
      • by Sifmole (3409) on 2003.05.02 13:32 (#19736)
        This statement: Britain and europe never really had a culture of slavery - they benefitted greatly from slavery elswhere and through the slave trade but a lot less than the United States, where slavery was a major part of its economy and culture for a long time and a root of many of its racial problems today.

        Nearly make me spit soda out of my nose.

        You are of course kidding right? You do of course remember that little period of world history often refered to as "The Age of Colonization". That period where England, France, and the Dutch formed colonies all over the world for the purpose of leeching as much as the could from the "natives". You do of course remember that the Dutch set up South Africa, right? The Spanish would have done the same, but some reason they prefered to eliminate entire cultures, Mayans, Incans, and Aztecs.

        The slave trade was in full-swing long before the American Revolution, longer before there ever was a United States -- I wonder who that was? Even after the revolution the Dutch were the primary source for African slaves. Also, please remember a term "Indebtured Servitude"; they were perfectly willing to enslave anybody, not just Africans

        Even well before all of that the Romans and Greeks used slavery as an institution. The form was different in very substantial ways but it was still forced labor without pay.

        Britain and France in particular built their empires on the backs of slavery and experienced significant decline after they resolved to let it go.

        The United States achieved it rise from the industrial revolution and well after the abolition of slavery. It wasn't until after the World War I that the United was anything more than the ruffians across the sea, and not until after World War II that the United States achieved "Super Power" status. All of this occured AFTER slavery had been abolished.

        Instead the United States owes it prosperity to two things: Location and the disenfranchised.

        • In fairness, he did say that Britain benefitted from slavery.

          But, yeah, it is kind of odd to say that Europe never had a 'culture of slavery' when Spanish, Portuguese and English settlers introduced slavery into North America, enslaving the Indians and bringing in African slaves to work the large plantations they developed there.

          Probably the primary reason there was so little slavery in Europe was the serfdom of European peasants. Why go to the trouble of buying and importing troublesome slaves when serf

            • I wonder if we can trace any European attitudes of today to their serfdom at the hands of noblemen for many hundreds of years? Serfdom existed in Europe far longer than slavery existed in America.

            I'll answer my own question. Perhaps this [city-journal.org] can be explained by Europe's long history of a class-based society with little mobility.