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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • by btilly (5037) on 2005.03.28 22:47 (#39206) Journal
    I'm not even of the opinion that his view is particularly indefensible. Except the big part where he says that this is why a large group of people choose what they choose.

    He's clearly wrong about that. Many of those people don't feel that way, and I'd wager that the vast majority don't. At least the vast majority of the ones that I've seen talking about it don't.

    For instance I look at the situation and I say to myself, If I'm ever in her position, I want people to admit that I'm dead, hold a decent funeral, and move on. It isn't a question of resources. I don't care if you can keep me "alive" for a thousand years. It is that I'd be gone and my strong preference is to let people get on with the grief process sooner rather than later. I abhor the idea of causing people that I care about extended pain when there is no hope for me.

    I know that I'm not alone. Plenty of people in hospitals have made the decision to be DNR and/or DNI. I'm sure that they have different reasons for so deciding, but I've never had a conversation with a friend who says that they would choose that who cite economics as a factor. Therefore I suspect that economic considerations, implicit or explicit, are not a major cause.

    And when people who come at this from my point of view look at the situation, we see a valid non-economic reason to end the semblance of life in someone who really died a long time ago.

    Regards,
    Ben

    PS His 50 million unborn children figure? That's less than the number of potential children who are lost each time the average man masturbates! It is also too low. Far more potential babies than that are lost to natural miscarriages, mostly before 2 weeks of age. However the fact that he would cite that when it has nothing to do with the rest of what he writes strongly suggests certain biases on his part. That someone with those biases would make nasty insinuations about people who want to let Schiavo finish the business of dying surprises me not at all.
    • Except the big part where he says that this is why a large group of people choose what they choose.

      He actually manages to misrepresent both sides. I think he's trying to play psychologist (or economist) and get at people's alleged underlying unspoken motivations. Whether or not those motivations are truly there and are truly as he describes is an interesting thought to ponder.

      For instance I look at the situation and I say to myself, If I'm ever in her position, I want people to admit that I'm dead,

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers