Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • Look, I tried to learn Object-Oriented design. I really did. I knew software engineering was absolutely the most important area in my studies. I shelled out thousands of dollars for a bachelor's degree and most of a master's degree. I took software engineering as an undergrad and got a jerk of a professor who didn't teach a thing. He was the only unsatisfactory professor I had. At the end of the course I seriously considered going to the dean's office and demanding my money back and credit for the course revoked. And in all seriousness, today I wish I had.

    So then I took two software engineering courses as a graduate. They were helpful, at least, and the professor was much better. But somehow OO design still seems to be unteachable.

    And so I tried to learn it from the three software engineering textbooks I'd accumulated. And guess what? They suck. I've seen UML designs for elevators, zoos, animals, and all kinds of crap. For some insane reason, they can't show me how to produce an object oriented design for an actual program. I have no idea why these books think I can learn to design a program when they only teach me to design things that aren't programs. I have no idea why the teachers thought so, either.

    Actually this wasn't just true of the OO design. The design methodology taught without OO suffered from the same problem. In the middle of the second course I found myself wanting to beg the professor, "Look, can you just teach us how to use this notation to design a program that accepts two numbers as input, provides a menu of the four basic arithmetic operations, and then performs that calculation and gives the output?" Another thing I wish I'd done rather than just thinking about.

    By now I should be an expert at this, but so far I haven't learned a thing about formal object oriented design. They told me it was astoundingly important, they told me the notation was the best invention in the world, but they still couldn't figure out how to use it to program.

    Contrariwise, I actually learned a lot about OO design from Perl programmers and Perl documentation, and in every design experience with peers (work and formerly school) I'm told that my designs are usually highly admired. But I'm missing whatever I was supposed to get out of learning formal object oriented design, and it's because textbooks think they can teach it by showing you how to design an Aardvark.

    --
    J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
    • I've read (okay, skimmed) a lot of software design or OO design texts, and I've found similar things. Most of them suck, a lot. ( Even our books have occasional howlers [oreillynet.com].) If I'm right and the design of Java can mitigate some of the damage of bad use of OO, then this doesn't matter so much for Java users; their programs will tend to converge on the local maxima which happens to be only slightly better than the global minima.

      For programmers in languages which lack the "Everybody buckle up" philosophy by d

      • J. David has an advantage in that he works really hard, he has a passion for writing good software, and he knows many of the world's best Perl programmers.

        I think I'm going to put that on my resume. :)

        --
        J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
      • Anyone know if O'Reilly's Head First Object-Oriented Analysis and Design [oreilly.com] is any good or not?

        --
        J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers

    • Yeah. I hear ya. I don't think universities can teach computer security either. Sometimes, in some fields, the text books rock. I adored anthropology. The algorithms book I walked away from CSci with was... well, it was technically correct, but within the confines of that, it was as utterly unhelpful as it possibly could be. Java programmers, being interested in a career, go through Csci, but it's in the field, and from books off amazon.com, that they learn this stuff, just like the C++ programers bef
      • Thank you!

        --
        J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers