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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I doubt itmss is anything more than itms over SSL. And I doubt that itms/daap are anything more than HTTP over high numbered ports, with maybe some extra metadata lurking somewhere. It would be too expensive for Apple to invent a completely new protocal when HTTP can be beaten into submission for virtually any task (e.g. SOAP).

    Any clues where they're using itmss vs. itms? Sending purchased tracks perhaps?

    • Any clues where they're using itmss vs. itms? Sending purchased tracks perhaps?

      There's no need to encrypt the downloaded AAC files since the DRM is already in place before it's downloaded (that's an educated guess). The encryption is probably only for authentication (both the user and machine, for the sake of DRM) and accessing user account information (including the credit card number). Perhaps the authorization "key" which unlocks a file to play on a particular machine would be encrypted to prevent mali
      • There's no need to encrypt the downloaded AAC files since the DRM is already in place before it's downloaded (that's an educated guess).
        I don't think AppleMusic is using DRM. Didn't pudge demonstrate that all of the restrictions are done within iTunes? If they're not using DRM, then encrypting the AAC files in transit will cut down on stealing a track when someone else pays for it.
        • by extra88 (4181) on 2003.05.02 8:14 (#19715)
          Of course iTunes Music Store is using DRM! You can't play a purchased track on a computer until you use iTunes to authorize it (which involves communicating with an Apple server) and you can only have 3 computers at a time authorized to play a particular track.

          What pudge demonstrated was iTunes playlist *sharing* (i.e. streaming) is basically HTTP and using a properly formed URL, you can download a track. This trick will not get you a DRM-free copy of a purchased AAC track, the client computer still has to be authorized to play it. Even when a purchased file is streamed to a client, it requires authorization of the client computer (which is lame, but there it is).