Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • Remember that it isn't just about the candidate convincing you, you need to convince the candidates. Particularly so for the best candidates.

    For instance I deduct points from an organization that asks me to wear business casual (or even worse a suit) when I do not need to talk with clients. Think of it as a negotiating point. At some point I'm being offered enough money for my needs, so I'm going to look at non-monetary benefits like work atmosphere.

    • We attempt to convince potential contractors and employees to come on board by pointing out the perks. Here is a handful off the top of my head.

      • We have a great track record of converting contractors to full time employees.
      • We're very flexible on when you start work (one guy starts at 7:30 or 8, some of us are in by 9, some are in by 10).
      • We have days when we can telecommute.
      • Our "official" dress code is business casual but jeans have been pretty common for the past year or so.
      • Periodically the Engineering department will go on an outing. (The company paid for our department to go see Get Smart at the theater, during work hours, when it first came out.)
      • My current job is similar, but more extreme.

        Meaning there is wider variation on when we get in and we don't have an official dress code at all.

        Anyways it may help that I live in California. I knew expectations differed, so when I moved out here I ssked my interviewer whether I should wear a suit when I showed up. His response was, "You are free to wear a suit, and we are free to laugh at you."