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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • "removed" is always also "incompatible". I don't think there is any need for having both.

    I don't particularly like "version" and "date". They're different in the sense that they must (or at least should) always come first, but now look like all the others. It's not a big deal, though. I really think this proposal is much better than the previous. It's good that you considered multiline items too.

    Can the markers be made case insensitive? I think people may like Version or SECURITY.
    • Copied from your comment on the first post...

      > As for the timestamp, you'd have two things, whitespace separated, instead of one. dateTtime may be the standard, but date time is much more commonly seen in the wild. And for a very good reason.

      Hm. I suppose it is meant to be a simple format. Okay - so long as the dates are yyyy-mm-dd[ hh:mm[:ss]] and nothing else, I can live with that.

      I suppose you're right about "removed", in a sense, as it is a feature-oriented label. I just got used to it bala

    • "removed" is always also "incompatible". I don't think there is any need for having both.

      I disagree. An addition is incompatible too. There's no harm in being a bit more specific!

      To me, "incompatible" means a change in how things are used: the functionality is still there, only, you'll have to try to achieve your goal in a slightly different manner: for example, using another function, or with a change in parameters.

      If older functionality is no longer available, that's more than just a change.

      • Incompatible, in a changelog, means: you should anticipate breakage caused by this change.

        Pure additions typically never break existing code.