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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Yeah, homeschooling is one of those odd things where both the extreme left and extreme right have a tendency to have common resources and goals. One of my left-ish friends homeschooled his kids, and had lots of conversations with right-ish homeschoolers as well. Interesting.
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    • Randal L. Schwartz
    • Stonehenge
    • This is one of the things I really like about homeschooling. There are so many different points of view. As long as all subscribe to the fundamental mantra of homeschooling, in my mind, "Parents are the best judge of how to raise and educate their own children," I appreciate what they are doing and love looking at the diversity for cross-pollination of ideas.

      Somewhere I read somebody saying the tree-huggers (or some similar offensive term for leftist environmentalists) paved the way, the religious funda

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      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
      • Parents are the best judge of how to raise and educate their own children

        And... everyone is above average [freep.com] too.

        On a more serious note, being the best judge of how to do it (which I don't agree with... but let's just pretend for a moment) still doesn't make you the most capable person of doing it.

        I personally will be home schooling my kids... every day after they get home from school. I will add to their learning experience.

        Not shield them from it.

        It seems to me that this is the real purpose for many po
        • On a more serious note, being the best judge of how to do it (which I don't agree with... but let's just pretend for a moment) still doesn't make you the most capable person of doing it.

          Exactly. Which is why, if you'll look at other comments I've made, you'll see that I insist that homeschooling is not for everybody. It is up to the parents to decide what is best for their children, and act accordingly.

          For example, my wife was homeschooled, and her parents and some other homeschooling parents got to

          --
          J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
          • Way to not read what I said. My whole point was that of these four families involved in homeschooling, not a one of them was doing it to "shield" or "shelter" their children.

            I did read what you said. (Understanding... well that is a different matter.)

            I also tried to write my response in such a way as to not imply I was talking about you or your situation in particular. Looks like I failed.

            The only part about you specifically I was referring to was the quoted comment, which I saw you commented about else
            • I also tried to write my response in such a way as to not imply I was talking about you or your situation in particular. Looks like I failed.

              I understand that. I'm just saying that you seemed to be generalizing that shielding kids is often or usually the reason for homeschooling kids ... the whole point of my journal entry was that that is changing.

              But, the other point I was trying to make is that I don't see how replacing an educational experience is better than augmenting the experience.

              Er, wel

              --
              J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
              • Would you question a parent who moved a kid from one school to another for replacing the educational experience instead of augmenting it?

                No. (To answer your question.)

                I wouldn't even question a parent that home schools... hell, someone has to work for my kid. ;-)

                But, I also don't consider moving a kid from one school to another to be the same as removing a kid from school to home school instead. (My first reaction would probably be to move from a public school to a private school.)

                The reason I don't consider them the same is qualifications. In general, a parent is not as qualified to teach the core subjects (reading, writing, math, science) as a professional teacher. OTOH, schools generally require some type of certification in an attempt to insure some minimal level of competence... so, it is (generally) less of an issue moving from school to school. (As long as you stay away from some charter schools [blogspot.com].) And, yes... that is a lot of generalizing. Some parents are freaking geniuses and no school is going to be able to touch what they can teach their kids. That isn't common.

                I'm saying that the existence of some bad parents does not justify presumption of the right to interfere with parental decisions in general.

                I most definitely agree. Strongly. And, though it makes me very uncomfortable to say so, I don't believe the right to be absolute.

                I don't think it can be if we wish to remain civilized.

                You mean both for one family, or both for everybody?

                What I mean is, instead of two choices... you have three. And the third is the best of the three. (IMHO) Formal school, and continued education at home.

                And yes, there are time issues. But, those don't go away by home schooling. I used to be an instructor (in the military)... and one hour of classroom lecture took about four hours of prep time. And this was for "highly motivated" adults with more than four years of service... who already had a basis of knowledge to build upon.

                That doesn't scale well if you aren't giving the same lesson more than once. But, that is essentially what would happen with home schooling. (For the first kid, anyway.)

                So, it seems to me that the greatest learning would occur with a mixture of the two. And, while the kids are at the formal school you get some lesson prep time as a bonus.

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                In summary, I think home schooling is a great option for some kids, in some situations.

                I don't have a problem with it.

                My problem was with the statement that a parent knows best. I simply don't believe that is always the case. I'm not even convinced it is true most of the time. But, I wouldn't want anyone else making the decision...