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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • ... is it fast enough to be useful?

    As we discovered when I tried to use AI::Prolog in a "real application" last year, it's one thing to be able to do the work, it's another thing entirely to be able to do it fast enough to be actually useful.

    Ruby is already famous for being slow because of all the layered abstraction, is their implementation of that logic stuff fast enough to implement, for example, a 100 guest "dinner party problem" solution in a reasonable time?

    • My reply became long enough that I have a dedicated post about benchmarking the Ruby and Perl implementations [perl.org]. Short answer, it's a hell of a lot faster, but depending on your constraints, you still would have problems doing the "100 guest" dinner party.

    • I didn't recognize the phrase, so I googled for it and got too much. If I tried to add Prolog to the query all I got was your post.

      So I have to ask. What is the problem?
      • I don't know if there is an exact problem, per se, but I assume it's like any other scheduling problem. You have lots of guests and ...

        • Bob has a restraining order against Alice.
        • Alice has a crush on Tim.
        • Tim has a crush on Bob.
        • William is violently homophobic.
        • Sarah is a vegetarian.
        • ... and so on.

        And you have to find seating and dinner arrangements which are suitable for everyone. It is, as you know, a potentially very difficult problem.