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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Moose has it's issues... certainly the big memory overhead and the slow startup are issues.

    (Yes, I know they are working on it, and it's gradually getting better...)

    But even though it's heavy, source filters are up there in a whole different (worse) class of crazy, as it the original bad implementations of Inside Out objects.

    But you have to remember that this weight is there for a reason, and that's to allow not-brilliant programmers to do useful work without hurting themselves as seriously.

    • this weight is there for a reason, and that's to allow not-brilliant programmers to do useful work without hurting themselves as seriously.

      You mean it's coded defensively, robustly? Well, I wish a few more "brilliant" programmers would try that. I thought it was because of all the metaclass/introspection stuff. (I'm recently liking Moose. Add a couple modules like MooseX::Params::Validate and MooseX::StrictConstructor, coercing parameters to types, before/after/around, ah it's not bad... Slower, maybe (co

    • Switch.pm has no dependencies. It's short. Moose has many deps and lots of code. Certainly source filters carry a lot of bad juju. Moose is huge and complex. I can't honestly say that that makes it "as bad" as Switch, but I think the analogy is fair. Or, as I said in another comment, comparing it to Inline::C vs XS might have been more fair. When distributing modules on CPAN, it's much better to use XS. Using Inline::C, which though it's awesome and generally works well, you're piling magic on top o