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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • ...did you call it 'some_method'. has is not sub. It's a nice red herring though, throwing me off completely till I saw rjbs's answer. If it'd been called "some_field", it'd been obvious.

    rjbs has explained what went wrong, but I'm curious why you'd expect it to behave differently. The behaviour is exactly as documented in Moose's section on is => 'rw'|'ro'.

    • Sorry about that. I just hastily threw together an example. But what's the value of allowing me to declare an attribute without an accessor or mutator? I'm sure there's a reason. I just don't see it.

      • There are a few reasons I can imagine, and several I'm fairly sure I'm too afraid to consider. :-)

        One reason would be because one wants to explicitly set the 'reader' and the 'writer'.

        has babelfish => (
            writer => 'schrieb_fish',
            reader => 'lit_fish',
        );

        But that doesn't explain why there is no warning if there is no reader/writer assigned at all. But that could happen because one want to create those sometime during runtime. Wacky, but I can imagine a few motivations to