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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • "What's more, I can't see why I should spend 16 hours this week reporting that a planned maintenance downtime took 4 hours to recover."

    You are improving your manager's manager's manager's comfort factor.

    "But I'm having trouble seeing what value I'm generating for my employer today."

    By learning how to use Excel, you are improving the turn around time on your manager's manager's manager's comfort factor in preparation for the next planned maintenance downtime.

    • Thank you. That does actually explain it in more measurable terms. :)

      Finally solved the problem, btw. (The journal entry was mostly drafted toward the end stages of figuring it out.)

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
      • You're welcome. I've run into things like this before involving higher level management and more often than not it will come down to making them feel better.

        Congratulations. So now you should be ready to start coding up a Perl solution so that it doesn't take umpteen hours everytime you have a 4 hour window of downtime for scheduled maintenance. :)

        • Actually that's what I did last week for the spreadsheets they told me about ahead of time. And for this part, I already have a Perl solution to spit out the raw data. I just need to cut and paste it into the existing spreadsheet template.

          --
          J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers