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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • by jmason (3282) on 2003.07.10 12:14 (#21940) Homepage
    perforce rocks. It's got a great web GUI, and it can do the best automated merges of any SCM tool I've used. Most importantly, it's really well supported, great company, open mailing lists, etc. Arch -- sounds good -- like p4 it does good automated merges. However I've heard negative things about the maintainer's attitude etc. This is a thumbs-down for me. svn -- good in all respects except for automated merges. Nowadays, I'd use p4 for a commercial project or svn for a free one.
    • To me, the big plus of p4 compared to svn is this ability to merge with history. But for other aspects, I find svn easier to use. No need to 'p4 edit' files, supports several operations (svn diff, svn status) without a connection, customizable. Note that I don't use GUIs.

      You could use p4 for free projects, for personal repositories. I think that several former pumpkings do.

      May I link once again to a couple of articles about svn [oreillynet.com].

    • Maintainers' attitude doesn't bother us too much - we do use qmail after all ;-)
    • My question to anyone who has used Perforce is: Have you used any of the other tools with great merge capabilities, like BitKeeper or Arch?
    • Apparently there's an Arch fork called ArX, so you can take your pick of maintainer attitudes.

      I say this as a person who thinks forks are a good thing.

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
    • What Justin said.

      p4's merging magic is awesome. I hope SVN will get there some day too.

      Running the SVN server on Apache 2.0 gives you all the usual Apache-framework goodies (authentication modules etc) and is well worth it IMO.

        - ask
      --

      -- ask bjoern hansen [askbjoernhansen.com], !try; do();