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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I use apt-get from the command line when I know exactly what I want, but Synaptic is a very good GTK-based package manager which I use for my regular updates. The 'status' view allows you to see packages that have an upgrade available. You can drill down into them to see full descriptions and file listings. And of course you can choose which ones you want to upgrade. Synaptic rocks.
    • Cool. Thanks for the tip. Synaptic [nongnu.org] sounds exactly the kind of thing I want :)
      • You didn't get Synaptic installed by default ? It's already in a stock Ubuntu install and they sorta recommend it.

        The SMTP (Postfix) is because Debian requires some sort of MTA to send error messages and so on. But it doesn't listen to anything other than 127.0.0.1 (Ubuntu has a no open ports by default policy, which is also why you didn't get a sshd, most likely)

        I migrated from Redhat myself. It's been nice so far and apt-get/dpkg take a lot of the pain away (yum and rpm had a few problems for me). Is FC really that much better ? never tried it.

        • As it happens Synaptic was installed by default, it was just that I'd never heard of it, so didn't know to look for it ;)

          Thanks for the update about Postfix and sshd. At least I know why now. Alas I can't uninstall Postfix and several other things without uninstalling Ubuntu because of the way they have created their dependancies, which is a shame.

          To be honest, I only tried FC1 briefly and I didn't find it too bad. But then I was used to the file structure. I'm getting used to Ubuntu, and one good thing

          • I haven't tried ubuntu yet (hope to soon) but I've been using Debian for ages, so I have an idea. I expect you should be able to rid yourself of postfix by installing a "lite" or "dummy" package that provides mail-transport-agent, and still keep the things you care about. If you want to try it but have questions or problems, give me a shout and I'd be glad to look more closely at it. (The ssmtp and nullmailer packages might interest you, though they might not be on the ubuntu CDROM.)