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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Current evidence suggests that we're dragging down the rest of the world with us. See for instance recent Economist articles on how countries that thought they were more insulated from the US economy than in the past are discovering that they are still highly exposed to the USA.

    We're just too big a part of the global economy for the global economy to ignore our implosion.
  • There's drag and then there's drag.

    We're in the middle of a short-term global credit shock, at the start of a medium-term energy and food shock, and we've still got unquantifiable environmental shocks ahead of us which will reflect at the very least in the insurance and reinsurance markets.

    With food prices for most stables linked to energy prices, the prospect of a simultaneous energy/food shock (two of the most fundamental products) means the entire world is moving in a recessionary direction anyways.

    The q
    • "But those US numbers suggest we're moving into a new more dramatic phase now, and it remains to be seen what impact that will have."

      That's the dangerous thing about numbers, once people believe them they start to become real. People are behind those numbers, and people always have an agenda or a bias, no matter how subtle.

      It is interesting to follow all of the economic speculation in the news. The one thing that seems to be missing from the equations though is that surprising adaptability that homo sap

  • Writing lots of paragraphs of less than or equal to two sentences makes it seem more analytical, doesn't it?

    • It certainly helps my frame my argument more cleanly...

      Also, it's probably a fallout from writing POD documentation.

  • I find the writings of By F. William Engdahl to be very informative. He has just published a new essay on the asset securitisation debacle [321gold.com] in the USA. It contains a succinct passage that brings clarity to the issue I've not seen elsewhere:

    Lending banks no longer needed to carry a mortgage loan on its books for 20-30 years as was traditional. They sold it on at a discount and used the cash to turn the next round of credit issuing.

    That meant as well that the lending bank now no longer had to worry if the l

  • There are a lot of problems, but none of them are new, and we've gotten through just as bad. Yes, I am not worried.

    The fall of the U.S. dollar is not bad. It just is. I called that, hell, last decade maybe? And it's happened about when I thought it would.

    And we were actually running a government deficit before and during the dot-com years. The budget was very briefly in surplus during the best of those years, but our unfunded liabilities, especially medicare and social security and debt interest, conti