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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Yup, that was me.

    Actually, the thing I like about Kpresenter is that it doesn't have all that many bells and whistles. Basically, you have text, imported graphics, and various sorts of transitions (pop-in, slide from left, right, top, bottom, etc).

    That's about all I need form presentation software. My motivation is that I remember reading something about doing good presentations (by Damian, perhaps?) that suggested that effective presentations should not simply plop a whole bunch of text and bullet po
    • The point about effective presentations is a general business one, so one of the umpteen thousand business-help folks probably made the message in 36-point arial :-) But it is an excellent point, so I think I'll keep plugging away with KPresenter and see how it goes.

      This reminds me of an article I read a few months ago in the New Yorker about how Powerpoint has changed business communication. (Unfortunately, the New Yorker doesn't seem to have back issues online. Lame.) Not just PPT, but computer-aided presentations in general. If people aren't fed bite-sized pieces of information, if the presentation is more than 3-5 bullets per page, or any of the other ways that default presentations get created, people don't pay attention and don't learn. This was, of course, mostly anecdotal, but it went into some detail as to why this was so and provided some historical background to the world of presentations. Interesting stuff.

      • I'm not terribly experienced in giving presentations, but I do subscribe to the 'bullet at a time' approach. I remember when I was at University that some lecturers would put up OHP acetates containing huge blocks of text and then proceed simply to read through them. Not really the best way to impart the message, but great for students who want a complete set of notes, as we'd just copy it all down.

        We're pretty much an MS shop at work here, so PPT is the only software I've used. I've got mixed feelings abo