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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Disclaimer: I do AV/Anti-spam for ~ 250,000 folk. Many of my e-mail addresses are also plastered all over the 'net, so I get plenty of these bounces too.

    Still, from my perspective, mail must *not* get lost. Failure to deliver a message to it's recipient must *always* generate a bounce message (i.e., an SMTP 5xx error).

    Why? Because I don't trust anti-virus software to always do the right thing. I don't trust anti-spam software to always do the right thing. I don't trust *BLs and local block lists to

    • I fail to see how an automated message saying "A message you didn't send to someone you don't know couldn't be delivered" is useful.

      • I fail to see how an automated message saying "A message you didn't send to someone you don't know couldn't be delivered" is useful.

        It's not. And if you've got an algorithm that can determine when to silently drop mail on the floor with no false positives, I'm all ears. But RFC 2821, s4.2.5 is quite clear on an MTA's responsibilities after it accepts a message. I don't think picking and choosing which bits of an RFC to implement is a good idea.

        Yes, 2821 is in need of an update to deal with today's In