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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • The mathematician is Ken Ring - his site is at http://www.predictweather.com/ [predictweather.com], and he mentioned the 1833 earthquake in his December 29, 2004 e-zine [topica.com]. 1833 + 19 * 9 is indeed 2004.

    Turns out I misinterpreted what Ken said... the moon is actually 1/80th the mass of the earth, not 1 tenth, and the gravitation effect thing is a net measurement of the effects on the ocean. The reasoning is that because the tides are predominantly affected by the moon and not the Sun, that the net force created by the moon must be more. According to textbook gravitational equations, and estimated values for the mass of the Sun, Earth and Moon (actually, these values are derived from the result, but we'll ignore that for now) - the sun exerts about 100 times the gravitational force compared with the sun. Yet we do not see a lunar tide 1/100th the size of the tide from the sun. Confused? Not as much as psysicists should be :-).

    • s/(100th the size of the tide from the) sun/$1 moon/
      • You mean?

              the sun exerts about 100 times the gravitational
              force compared with the moon. Yet we do not see
              a solar tide 100 times the size of the tide
              from the moon.

        The solar tide is what we see with spring and
        neap tides, I think. Spring tides are higher and
        lower than neap tides, because the moon is new or
        full.

        But how do we separate out the variation in water
        movement due to the moon and that due to the sun?

        Some places on