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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Sounds like a great idea to me. I wish someone had taught me scheme at 11. I'd say do everything as functional as you can, though; no imperative style. That will be easy enough to learn later.

    --
    J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
    • I agree about doing it as functional as possible and I plan to.

      I think that strictly speaking, even sequencing operations is procedural, not functional.

      So,

      (html-meta ...)
      (html-table ...)
      (html-footer ...)

      Is essentially procedural in nature.

      The functional way to do this, I believe, would be something like:

      (map html-gen
            '((meta parm1 parm2 parm3)
                (table parm1 parm2 parm3)
                (footer parm1 parm2 parm3)))

      Maybe I

      • I'm not as into Lisp and functional programming as I want to be, so I can't provide expert insight. All I can say is what I wish. :)

        Definitely search out Paul Graham's material on the net and absorb.

        Should I really go to the trouble of eliminating sequencing?

        I am not educated enough to say on that, yet.

        If I'm going to go this route, no setq's either. Just call the outer driver with literal lists.

        I do think avoiding setq's is good.

        I learned scheme followed by Lisp, and the way I was taught mad

        --
        J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
          • Definitely search out Paul Graham's material on the net and absorb.

          I'm familiar with Paul Graham, but from what I can tell, he leans heavily toward Common Lisp and is pretty advanced. I prefer stuff like SICP [mit.edu], HtDP [htdp.org], the refreshingly simple TYSiFD [neu.edu] and The Scheme Programming Language [scheme.com]. All online! None of these texts is appropriate for my 11 year old, but I'm using some of their approaches as inspiration.

          • Bah! There are plenty of scheme programmers here (and I'm not talking about folks like me who can't