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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Note that git stores files based on their SHA-1 fingerprint. No matter how many copies of a particular file you have, and no matter when and how they were created, all of them together will only take up space once. So unless *all* of your artefacts change *all* the time, it should be fairly cheap to keep them around.

    • A lot of the objects are jars which contain timestamps. :(

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
  • I think I would try keeping the artefacts in a different branch, putting a different .gitignore in each branch. When you want to build, you check out the build branch, merge the source branch, build, and commit. To resume developing, you check out the source branch again.

    I haven’t thought through all the consequences, but I think that would be a fairly practicable way of keeping binaries around without mixing the build-related history and the source-edit-related history into a giant mishmash. It als

    • Thanks for the suggestion! I will add this to my musings over the next few days. :)

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers