Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • I don't know if they specify specifically 5.8.4, but the word on street is that if you want to use unicode, it wasn't acting sane until 5.8.4.

    The big 5.8 thing in Perl::MinimumVersion is also "use utf8;". So given the diversity of applications it supports, unicode would seem an obvious one.

    Hang on a second.... there's a better way of doing this. perlver to the rescue!

    adam@red:~/.cpan/build$ perlver Catalyst-5.33/

          -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    • Funny you should mention Perl::MinimumVersion, as I would liked to have used it. Its another that is on my list with dependency failures. Unfortunately Test::SubCalls is failing the same tests as imacat's report [perl.org], except mine fails on Windows, Perl 5.6.1.

      I have been doing the checking by hand previously and noting to the authors that it really does work for 5.6.1, however I had planned to write something that can do that (using Perl::MinimumVersion) to check a distribution as soon as it produces a NA repor

  • For changelogs, you can either look at the extensive Changes* files found in the perl source distribution, or use perlbrowse at http://public.activestate.com/cgi-bin/perlbrowse [activestate.com]
    • I guess it's better than nothing, but it still requires a lot of effort to figure out what changes went into which version. There is no mention of the module version being updated in those changes files. This might be acceptable for looking up one module, but once you start trying to look at the differences for other files, it starts to become painful.

      Hence why I was hoping there might actually be a Changes file for each individual file. :(

      • I think that Module::Corelist contains the Perforce revision number for each release. Also, you can use the corelist command to see which version of the module went into each release.

        steve@kirk:~/perl-encode$ corelist -a File::Path

        File::Path  was first released with perl 5.001
          5.001      undef
          5.002      1.01
          5.00307    1.01
          5.004      1.04

        etc.

        As for queries by file, the perlbrowse site will let you browse the 50 most