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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • It also helps to have a rigorous definition of "success" too. I've seen projects that ended because they were no longer providing value to the customer. I consider it a sign of success if, due to agile development, the customer and the developers discover this as early as possible--even several months into the project--rather than much later, towards the originally scheduled delivery date.

    I must admit that I'm very curious who these Big-A Agile hucksters are. Most of the agile and XP people I know are a lot smarter than you might think from these characterizations.

    • It also helps to have a rigorous definition of "success" too.

      Yep. Moving the goalposts doesn't help anyone.

      I've seen waterfall projects appear fail after 3 months, because someone was a little too sensitive to the amount of big up front design, a looming deadline, and no code to show for it. It's hard to tell, given a full 12 months, whether BDUF and Agile methods can both deliver something of equivalent value. My superstitious guess is that BDUF is more risky because it tends towards diddling