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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Why not just write things as Latin-1 if they consist only of characters [\x00-xFF], and UTF8 otherwise?
    • Won't those characters show up wrongly when you expect to see UTF-8 characters, then? I don't really understand. Let's say I have ÿ, \xFF. I assume that character has some other byte representation in UTF-8. But how is that byte represented in UTF-8? Do you understand what it is that I don't understand?
      • I'm assuming all mp3-readers auto-detect encoding, so there's no "expecting to see UTF8" -- if you see UTF8, you see it and decode it as such, otherwise you assume it's something else. Remember, pretty much only UTF8 looks like UTF8.

        Or: if mp3s have an explicit settign that says what encoding something is, then presumably there's no guesswork involved at all.

        • MP3 tags aren't just for MP3 readers, they are for web browsers, databases, text files of various kinds, etc.
          • My "mp3 reader", I mean anything that accesses the tag data in the files, including libraries that just pass it on to other applications.

            But anyway. Ideally, calling applications (like a CGI that passes on the tag data) should make clear what kinds of data-encoding they can or can't cope with.