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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I don't know which author you're referring to, but that "winblows" attitude is awful. If you need that added layer of protection (and it seems reasonable), what are the odds of forking the module, ignoring the original author and switching to the fork? I hate suggesting that, but I can't think of an option other than "take the module away" and I would be horrified at the latter thought.

    • I think that there are many reasons why one could dislike Windows, and for those very reasons one would avoid spending effort/time in supporting that platform. This is something that happens all the time in many other fields, and not necessarily in the "Windows" direction - just think about the support for Linux of "mainstream software" like skype.

      Ranting and denying any type of support is probably a shortminded reaction, but I think that we should respect the decision of someone to *not* support something
      • Normally this might not be a problem.

        But the crypto modules impact everything.

        The result is "If you use security modules, you lose windows support".

        CPAN cares more about platform-compatibility than it does about security. Better that it work at all than work securely.

        Because of one single developer deciding he doesn't like windows, now nobody gets to have secure CPAN by default.

        All limitations imposed by an individual impact EVERYONE in your dependency chain.
        • I agree with you completely, and this is the very reason why a fork is not only justified, but necessary. Just to avoid being hostage of a single.

          Probably, the situation could be though as if one had to implement those modules from the scratch, but having a working reference implementation already available :)