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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I've looked at switching/using git at least twice in the last six months or so. Lately, it seems that native Win32 support is improving so that hurdle I had is dropping.

    I get most of it, conceptually, but I find some parts of the application of it confusing. It desperately needs more cookbooks, more examples of "here's how I work with it day to day" and not just by Linux kernel developers who are (a) highly-technical already and (b) managing a vast, decentralized project with their own particular legacy

    • The “-a” switch is because git has an indirection between the working copy and the repository: the index, ie. a commit-ready snapshot of the tree. You don’t commit the state of the working copy directly; you copy things from the working copy to the index (this is called staging), and then commit the index. If you make a change in the working copy but you do not stage it, a plain commit will not contain the change from the working copy. Explicit staging is done using git-add.

      The “-a

      • I wonder if that winds up being more helpful when working across tons of tiny C files across a large project -- staging in changes file by file as you edit and then when all of them are done making one big commit to the repository.

        I suppose I find myself doing something similar with SVK. Small commits to my local repo as I make changes and then pushing the whole thing (often lumped together) up the repository.

        --dagolden