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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • The 286 is pretty much a lost cause. It was a great advance when it came out, but that was also before Ronnie Raygun outlawed the Soviet Union. Don't expect much from this machine unless you can use software from that era. (I don't think that even Win3.x will run on it. XENIX would be "fun" if you can find a copy and deal with the pain...) Embedded systems today are using Pentium class processors, so a 286 doesn't even merit the rating of "glorified calculator" anymore. (If it were an Apple ][, a C64
  • I mean more like: In getting rid of these computers, is there something smarter than just throwing them in the garbage? Suggestions of interesting charities, etc.
  • Start reading on this page [thegreenguide.com] around 'Keeping electronics out of garbage also protects our health and the environment'. This isn't a canonical resource AFAIK, but just the first thing to turn up in a google search. Throwing away computers is a bad idea.

    At my place of employment, we have folks who make sure that all the bits that can be recycled do get recycled, and the bits which have to be disposed of as toxic waste are so-disposed. I don't know how one goes about that sort of thing on an individual level th
  • I'm not sure if they're everywhere, but a Goodwill store in Pittsburgh has a separate store for electronic equipment. If nothing else creative artsy types will nab stuff from there cheap and make fishtanks or something...