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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I am, frankly, more offended by the clearly false assertion by Jobs that we are not being treated like criminals than I am by the fact that I cannot share the music or burn playlists without limit (except in the case of copying files from shared playlists).

    First of all, the "good karma" limitations being placed on copying media are like the lock on your front door -- it's there to keep honest people honest, not prevent illegal activity. Anyone who wants to illegally copy digital music badly enough wil

    • Locks on houses seem really only to keep the owner out when they forget their keys. Honest people don't go into other people's houses and as you point out, criminals will not be detered by a lock.

      That being said... ;-)

      The real entity treating you like a "criminal" is the copyright owner. When, not if, the AAC protection is cracked it will be the RIAA and not Apple that slaps you with a DMCA violation. When you work around the 10 playlist burning limitation it will be the RIAA who comes after you, not Apple.

      I know I may sound like an Apple apologist here, but as long as we are trying to figure out who the "bad guy" is we might as well make all the relevant facts made clear.

      Thinking that the music industry (read: The Big 5) were going to let plain jane mp3 files be downloaded with no restrictions is naive. They have been bitten by their lack of vision repeatedly and frankly I'm amazed that Apple was able to negotiate even these restrictive terms.

      Plus, keep in mind you are not buying the song. The song is still owned by the copyright owner. You are simply licensing some rights temporarily. Check the EULA...
      • The real entity treating you like a "criminal" is the copyright owner. When, not if, the AAC protection is cracked it will be the RIAA and not Apple that slaps you with a DMCA violation. When you work around the 10 playlist burning limitation it will be the RIAA who comes after you, not Apple.

        Apple is the one preventing me from doing things with songs I might, as far as they know, have the legal right to do. I am not saying the RIAA gets a pass. The only reason Apple is doing what it does is to appease