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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I don't think chromatic is proposing that Perl start break back compat willy nilly. He's been quite clear that he wants to see Perl on a time-based release cycle with published deprecation schedules.

    Imagine if Perl release 4 times a year. Then if there was a desire to deprecate something, a release could say "feature X will be removed after 6 more releases, 18 months from now".

    That seems pretty reasonable.

    Furthermore, no one out there is jumping from 5.6 to 5.10 without some serious testing. Even with Perl'

    • I don't think chromatic is proposing that Perl start break back compat willy nilly. He's been quite clear that he wants to see Perl on a time-based release cycle with published deprecation schedules.

      Imagine if Perl release 4 times a year. Then if there was a desire to deprecate something, a release could say "feature X will be removed after 6 more releases, 18 months from now".

      That seems pretty reasonable.

      I don't disagree with anything you say. Heck, I agree with it.

      But

      I tried it. This is me. I have made m

      • I've been watching how some other projects manage this kind of stuff, and I have a few thoughts.

        First, you were doing maint releases, and backporting from dev into maint. I dont think that many projects have high frequency maint releases, in most projects maint releases are instead "just enough for the release to not be a problem" and only made as absolutely necessary. If a project has high frequency releases its at the bleading edge not in maint.

        Second, IMO backporting from dev to maint AT ALL only makes

        • Answering the easy bit:

          Would I be correct in thinking that leaving the quality of the latest blead aside that to release 5.11.1 is a matter of creating a tag, rolling and uploading a CPAN bundle and sending out an email?

          No, not just that. What really distinguishes a release from a mere developer snapshot is that a release has a perldelta file - a summary of the changes between the previous release and this release.

          (And what distinguishes a maintenance release from a developer release is that in a maintenance release we try very hard not to have anything regress, whereas a developer release is "please try this, and tell us what breaks")