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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I dare to ask... is there any specific reason why you stopped using SourceForge for your projects?

    • These are only my my personal reasons, and people should use whatever tool works for them.

      I started using SorgeForge because it was one of the services that offered free, public CVS hosting. They might have been the first, but I don't remember. They also had a file release area, a compile farm, and several other services that mostly duplicated what Perl already had. I found the compile farm very handy when I need to test things on a different operating system. When they also offered SVN, it was very easy to switch.

      However, any time I needed to do anything on the SourceForge website, I felt like it was some sort of text adventure game. I couldn't remember where anything was in the multi-layered menus, and even when I took notes things got moved around. The docs are generally good, but only if you can find the right docs. I have the same problem trying to download anything from SourceForge. I wish they could just give a download link and not make me think about packages, mirrors, or any of that other stuff. If I want that, Google Code looks much nicer.

      Then, a couple of months ago they turned off the Quick File Release feature, which I had automated with Perl screen-scraping. I was hoping they'd come out with a web service or something, but it never happened. There was something about turning off nightly tarballs too, as I recall, but I'm foggy on those details. I wasn't keen on reworking any of my SourceForge automation tools, and as I was reworking Module::Release, I decided to just not bring the SourceForge stuff up to date. Now that my release tool doesn't support any special SourceForge features, I don't use any special features. I decided that only using their SVN service wasn't enough to keep me there, especially when I don't want to use SVN anymore.

      Now, since I'm using Git, commit bits aren't a problem, so I don't need the user management features. The people who were on my projects weren't working on the modules anymore, so I didn't need to keep any accounts open for them.

      Subversion might still work for other people, it just doesn't work out for me.