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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I personally use CPAN.pm under Gentoo. I have never used an ebuild for a module. I let portage compile my perl core dist, and use CPAN.pm for the rest. But then, that's what I've always done. I always compiled my own perl and installed my own modules, so this seemed natural to me.

    I'm still in an RPM mindset a bit. I spent most of my time shunning packages put out by redhat, that I still have a bias against perl modules from the core dist.

    I would think that a hybrid solution would be best. Generating ebuil

    • I do similar things with FreeBSD (and now with fink on OS X).

      With FreeBSD, the system perl build is 5.005_03, and doesn't want to upgrade. All of the Perl ports (there are about a bazillion of them in  /usr/ports) all want that managed Perl build (which puts modules in  /usr/libdata). That also brings with it the *BSD ports issue of easy-to-install, hard-to-upgrade (dependencies are linked to particular port versions; ports will try and re-install an installed package just because there's a be

      • I recently found that the perl port has been made easier to use instead of the system perl in FreeBSD (won't catch me using that Linux thing  ;-) All you need to do is install the perl port and run "use.perl port".

        It's made life a lot easier on my -STABLE boxes. I hate using non packaged software; it descends into unmanageability so quickly it makes me shudder just thinking about it.

        -Dom