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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Not true.

    I'd say that the Strawberry Perl distro is much better than ActiveState (I almost said "vastly", but that would be unfair).

    AS is bearable if you have Visual Studio installed, and know a few extra PPM repos that you routinely set up on new machines.

    But when I tried out Vanilla and Strawberry Perl I was pleasantly surprised. Things just... worked! I had less problems installing some things on Windows than on Ubuntu (how. about. that!).

    If this experience can be verified by other Windows users (and I
    • The thing is, if you have pure-Win32 programmers that never touch Unix, they tend to be using Visual Studio and so on already. They have a familiarity with Visual Studio and the Win32 ways of working,

      In this environment, the better and less confusing environment for them does seem to be ActiveState.
      • I've found the opposite. I use Visual Studio.NET at $work, all day, every day so I'd consider that being a pure win32 programmer. But that's now in the age of .NET, where you don't have to know a lick of C to do real things, like http modules, services, etc.

        Back in the Visual Studio 6 days, one could compile a perl module [mod_perl.. oi] even if you didn't know C [as painful as it may have been to get studio to play along], and you could be fairly certain that the modules would work just fine.

        When .NET 1.0, 1.1, 2.0 came along, everytime I try compiling in VS.NET, I have a good chance of getting something that isn't quite stable because AS perl might have been compiled with VC6, while I'm in VS.NET compiling XS. IF you're a hardcore C person, maybe this isn't an issue for you to fix. For just a full time VS.NET user, forget it.

        All in all, a nightmare sometimes for no apparent reason. I gladly use strawberry perl because I know it doesn't come with all the insanity of guessing which framework/dlls the module is actually going to compile against and whether it wll work with AS perl or not.