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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • If you're not doing the work, why bother proposing that someone propose a grant proposal? Why not just say, "I'd like someone to take over this module, and additionally, I think it might make a decent grant proposal"?
    • Hi!

      If you're not doing the work, why bother proposing that someone propose a grant proposal? Why not just say, "I'd like someone to take over this module, and additionally, I think it might make a decent grant proposal"?

      I don't really understand why there's such a big difference between them. I was suggesting a good idea for a grant, and if someone is interested on hacking on the module even without the money, then I'll be fully supportive of him.

      Note that if no one volunteers (or receives a gr

      • I don't really understand why there's such a big difference between them.

        They are two distinct phases of the process. Who knows: maybe you'll find someone to do the work who does not want or need a grant (like almost every other project on the CPAN).

        But the entire purpose of the grant is to make other people involved in hacking my code. From my experience, such people can often give a new perspective on its development and come with many good ideas and code for further development.

        From my experience, it's a poor motivator. It may get more people interested, but often has a detrimental effect on the final project. The project should come first, and a grant should be sought only if there's no other good way to accomplish the goals of the project, but shouldn't be used as a way to attract people to work on it.