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NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I've used dual monitors for several years. What's on which side is largely dependent on which side whoever I'm pairing with is sitting. Absent that, factors like time of day (sunlight patterns) come in to play. However, I keep interruptions (email, IM) on a laptop off to the far right out of my direct line of vision.
  • I hadn't thought about the left/right brain connection. I've been using a dual-monitor setup for less than a year. I find I keep terminal windows and editors on the left and a near-full-screen browser (documentation and other reference material) on the right.

    That may be a hold-over from my single-monitor days or may have to do with where the menubar is. Keeping a browser window handy seems like the luxury, so it lives on the "extra" screen to the right.

    I haven't figured out what to do with IRC/AIM or

  • I've been using dual head for years now. The browser (and mail) is on the left head and the editor on the right head. I have never tried it the other way round. Having used Ion3 and now WMII2 as windows manager I always use fullscreen (sometimes tiling for terminal windows).
  • I haven't tried out a multiple monitor setup since the days when Apple could handle that seamlessly and Windows hadn't even heard of the idea.

    But I just opened up my docked laptop so I could email some of our hardware guys and tell them what model they had issued me. The screen popped on, and I thought of this journal entry, and I wondered: do you know if it's possible for me to use a laptop LCD screen and a monitor screen simultaneously as two independent screens? Or is what's on my video port inextric

    --
    J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers