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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • Software is information, not material. Good code is code where all meaningful repetition is abstracted away and all of its parts as different from each other as possible.

    Engineering is about making processes dependable and repeatable while labouring under the constraints of a reality of physical laws.

    I fail to see what applicability the latter can possibly have to the former. You may possibly be able to profit from rigorous engineering discipline to systematise the production of software, but even so, t

    • Software is information, not material.

      All software development is architecture, right up until you send source code through a compiler. That part is manufacturing.

      • Literally? Because I know that an architect would put three identical arcs next to each other on his blueprints without blinking; if a programmer wrote the same subroutine three times in a row, he wouldn’t get to work on anything noteworthy on my watch, if at all.

        • Literally?

          Only insofar as the part of software development where someone actually types code is still design, not production.

            1. So where does an architect’s work stop being architecture and start being manufacture of blueprints?

            2. So prior to typing the same thing thrice, you design an architecture that calls for typing it thrice?

            • So where does an architect’s work stop being architecture and start being manufacture of blueprints?

              In construction or in software development? In construction, it's at the point the blueprints stop changing--that is, usually, the day construction ends. In software, it's the same.

              So prior to typing the same thing thrice, you design an architecture that calls for typing it thrice?

              In construction, usually what happens is that the inspector says "This doesn't fly; redo it!" so you end up rewir

              • I have been trying for several days to understand the connection between your statements and the previous part of the thread, but there appears to be none. I am sorry to fail you.

                • Software is not like construction in that the only part of software development that actually manufacturers a good for end-user use is bundling the compiled (or aggregated) version for deployment.

                  Software is like construction in that all of the bizarre changes of architecture and requirements seen in software development also happen during physical construction of a building, sometimes even without regard for physical laws.

                  Having done both software development and construction, I find the classical view of software-as-construction (where software architects write the blueprints then throw them over the wall to blue-collar typists who put 2x4s in the right places) out of touch with the realities of both software development and construction.

                  (The second "construction" in the final sentence of my previous post should have read "software development".)