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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I have been delaying this update in the hope that a review of a videotape would provide definitive evidence, but attempts to obtain that information have not succeeded. But we can't wait forever for resolution, so here's an update.

    On the basis of the written record provided by Autrijus Tang [perl.org], it seems likely that the questions were stated a bit differently than I and some others present had recalled; here's a pseudo-code rendition of his version:

    if (outcome_of_discussion() > $threshold_for_action) {

    --

    Dr. Tim Maher
    CEO, Consultix
    Perl and UNIX Training [teachmeperl.com]
    • So some unknown portion of the FOR voters were voting against prejudicially closing debate, as opposed to voting for immediate development. This adequately explains the shock & awe in the community to the early reports.

      As Col.McKean said in Continental Congress about the question of discussing the question of Independence, nothing is too dangerous to talk about. In an open source community, I would hope the vote would be to discuss almost anything. (I draw the line at discussing deprecation of Perl

      --
      Bill
      # I had a sig when sigs were cool
      use Sig;
      • I am somewhat disturbed that a vote to continue discussion has been repeatedly reported as a vote to start a process. Apparently this was an inadvertent result of natural human optimism and vagueness combined with lack of formal minuting at a non-bureaucratic event.

        ... not to mention the spontaneity of the vote being sprung on us all, and the odd wording of the questions. What's more, "optimism" wasn't required for a reaction of "shock and awe". Nat Torkington, who was both present and against the idea o

        --

        Dr. Tim Maher
        CEO, Consultix
        Perl and UNIX Training [teachmeperl.com]
        • My feeling is that the first type of certificate we'd want to produce would be simply one that tests familiarity with the core language itself, which would be just enough to help HR departments screen out JAPH impersonators.

          Do you really mean to use the word 'familiarity'?

          As a person who hires perl programmers, I'm not looking for familiarity, I'm looking for proficiency. And not just proficiency in in knowing perl, but proficiency in the application areas, namely database interaction, secure web progr

          • I'll weed out the players. If I'm not hiring an entry level position, I want to hear about projects, applications, live sites, etc.

            I can evaluate familiarity in an interview in about 2 minutes.

            I'm sure you can; but the benefit of even the most rudimentary type of Perl Certificate would be that it would let your HR department filter out those who don't have a basic grasp of the language before they ever get to the point of a scheduled interview with you (whether by phone or in person). If you get 200 applicants for one job, as some people in our community do, that would save you a total of 400 minutes of wasted time at your 2-min. rate -- or even more, if the time blocked-out of your schedule for needless interviews could not be efficiently recycled.

            --

            Dr. Tim Maher
            CEO, Consultix
            Perl and UNIX Training [teachmeperl.com]