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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • What's difficult to believe, that teenagers sometimes make the wrong decisions or that complaining about it from relative safety, comfort, and the additional historical perspective of sixty intervening years is quite a bit easier than actually facing the choice yourself?

    If that's the way you judge the world, I certainly hope that you haven't made any mistakes even in the past ten years.

    • What stance is he taking now about his participation in the military? Does he admit to it openly and denounce it as an error in judgement?

      I am merely watching this from the sidelines, so I cannot answer these question, but that is the criterion by which he shall be judged.

      Not perfection is required, but ability to take responsibility one’s actions. Credibility is dependent upon this alone.

      • I don't understand the idea that it's hypocrisy to denounce an action that you yourself performed decades earlier. Could there be any debate technique less interesting?

        • This is similar to the situation I face in explaining my felony convictions [lightlink.com].

          I'm occasionally asked "do you believe what you did was wrong?", to which I must reply:

          If you're asking "would I do it again?", I would have to ask "knowing only what I knew then" or "knowing what I know now". To which the answers are then correspondingly: "yes", and "no".

          I don't believe I made an error in judgement. I made an error in how much (or little) I knew about my environment. I made perfect decisions regarding faulty information. I have since learned a few things about my environment that will affect future similar decisions. (The fact that this is now true, and could have been handled with a discussion with my client instead of a criminal prosecution for which I continue to suffer permanent and ongoing losses, is the tragic consequence of the story.)

          I think the same could be said for the new Pope. He chose as he did, perfectly, given what he was aware of at the time. And since then, he's acquired different knowledge, and would choose differently.
          --
          • Randal L. Schwartz
          • Stonehenge