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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • I am not sure how you reconcile this:

    a lot of what the US Supreme Court does is issue rulings on whether various laws are constitutional or not (unconstitutional laws are nullified), but the Constitution does not explicitly give the Court this power.

    with this [cornell.edu]:

    The judicial power [of the Supreme Court] shall extend to all cases, in law and equity, arising under this Constitution

    • Quite easily. :)

      It does not explicitly say anything about nullifying laws. It says they can decide the outcome of specific cases, but it says nothing about nullifying an entire law based on its constitutionality.

      Or maybe I'm reading it differently than you.

      The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law and equity, arising under this Constitution, the laws of the United States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their authority...

      If you read that sentence it as saying "The judicial

      • Quite easily. :)

        I don't think so.

        It does not explicitly say anything about nullifying laws.

        It's absolutely implicit.

        It says they can decide the outcome of specific cases, but it says nothing about nullifying an entire law based on its constitutionality.

        I don't understand how this is interesting at all. If someone sues over whether a law is legal/Constitutional, that obviously falls under the Supreme Court's mandate. There is nothing excluding that (either explicitly or implicitly), and it is a "case arisi
        • I was going to say that the fact that reasonable people can disagree on this point means we need a body to interperet the language of the constution to settle the disagreement. A body like the Supreme Court.

          Of course, then you could legitimately challenge the premise that I'm a reasonable person. (Which makes sense, if I go around making incorrect claims all the time, who's to say I'm reasonable?)

          Then I'd have to point out people who disagreed with Marshall's decision in Marbury vs. Madison and you coul