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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • One difference is that Perl is now in Git. To a small degree, you don't need a commit bit. Of course, nobody wants Perl to fork, but the work is less likely to languish if it's valuable. Plus, one gatekeeper (for CPAN a module) vs. a collaboration of gatekeepers (P5P) can make a difference.

    Someday I hope to see Perl development (whether Perl 5 or Perl 6) become more like the Linux kernel development. There, it's impossible for Linus to be expert on everything (but it is amazing how close he gets!) so he delegates patch review to lieutenants who pre-approve work that Linus pulls, thereby letting him scale better.

    If the corehackers project eventually organizes itself as a tree of developers with P5P at the root, then I can imagine it revolutionizing Perl development. And if you think Perl has compatibility issues, look at the Linux kernel by contrast!

    • I think the shared ownership is actually the key difference here. With modules, generally the original author retains an attachment to his code (unless they have so many modules that they can’t afford to care about any one of them in isolation, cf. Adam Kennedy). There is a resistance to accepting sweeping changes by an outsider.

      With a project like the perl core, this is much less of an issue. It’s not anyone’s personal baby.