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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • What I guess James doesn't know, or doesn't realize, is that in the case of @, % and $, they are actually meant to *help* readability. If a newb sees @, he knows it's an array. If he sees %, he knows it's a hash, etc.

    To an extent, this is very true. If you have some experience programming.

    But, if you don't have any/much experience programming... then this gets very confusing:

    $hash{element}

    Because a newbie sees the sigil and thinks: scalar

    Then along comes:

    $hash

    And he thinks: same scalar

    And it takes

    • But the sigil is right: $hash{element} and $hash are both scalars. I don't have a huge issue teaching this because most people get it once they know the rule: $ is one thing, @ can be many things, and % is a hash. I emphasize those points, and it works.

      Most people we teach don't get $hash and $hash{element} confused either. One doesn't have a curly brace after it. This is another thing we emphasize, and we find it very easy to teach.

      I can see the problem for people who teach themselves Perl from the
      • Most people we teach don't get $hash and $hash{element} confused either. One doesn't have a curly brace after it. This is another thing we emphasize, and we find it very easy to teach.

        Yep. Makes perfect sense to me. I agree totally.

        But... I've got some customers that, after a week, still couldn't tell the difference between those two variables. They (mostly) get the scalar / hash thing... and getting an element of a hash.

        But as soon as you give them (the scalar and the hash) both the same name, they fre