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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • They are part of a (now) well-known business pattern. Read The Innovator's Dilemma or its follow-up The Innovator's Solution.

    I'd never thought of applying the theory to programming languages. But it fits. Some of the pressures documented in The Innovator's Solution to pay close attention to existing customers apply in the case of Perl as well if you interpret them just right. The pricing part is not quite as good a fit, but it is close.

    However I've long said, if you want to improve the visibility of Perl, create a way for Perl to be used conveniently in shared hosting environments with reasonable performance. That's the big thing that PHP does that Perl does not. If you want to get someone to host your website and you're a cheapskate, you have a choice. Use PHP, or use CGI. Faced with that choice, lots of people start with PHP then never look back.

    • Umm, so why is Java so popular ? I've never seen an ISP that supported it.

      If Perl is going to compete with PHP, then its time for me to switch to Ruby.

      See also Idiocracy [imdb.com].

      • There are different paths to success. Java's path involves having a large marketing machine and significant corporate sponsors. There is no mystery there, but it isn't an example that Perl looks like it will duplicate soon.

        PHP's success is along a line that is closer to how Perl grew. Historically Perl was the language that people used for small and personal web projects, which sometimes grew up. That's how a lot of Perl projects started, and a lot of Perl people began learning the language. (Including
      • Umm, so why is Java so popular ?

        As an IT manager, you can buy a big huge manly server and hire a man-sized staff of dozens of barely-competent monkeys to write programs in it and look like a big man in front of your other big manly peers.

        (Don't blame me; Sun's marketing department uses libidinous phrases such as "opening the kimono".)

        Don't discount the value of being able to reach a level of success despite having to hire an army of barely-competent monkeys to write software for you.

      • Umm, so why is Java so popular ?

        Java takes a totally different approach facilitated by a huge marketing machine funded by number of large businesses who have bet the farm on Java.

        1) It's taught in schools.

        Java, sadly, is the predominant language taught in CS classes. Every year you have an army of CS students graduating and entering the workplace ready to code some Java on the cheap.

        2) Your CEO knows about Java.

        Java advertises in business magazines. Business folks have "Java" branded into their brains r