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All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

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  • New PODs in 5.8.0 (Score:4, Interesting)

    by jdavidb (1361) on 2002.07.19 13:02 (#10881) Homepage Journal

    I suddenly remembered that every time there's a new Perl release, there's a whole slew of new documentation that makes me a better Perl programmer. I decided to go hunting and diffing between /usr/local/perl561/lib/5.6.1/pod and /usr/local/perl580/lib/5.8.0/pod to see what's new. Many of you have no doubt known about these for a long time, but I don't read p5p, so they're new to me.

    New PODs in 5.8.0:

      • perl561delta.pod
      • perl56delta.pod
      • perl570delta.pod
      • perl571delta.pod
      • perl572delta.pod
      What changed in all the releases since 5.6.
      • perlapollo.pod
      • perlbeos.pod
      • perlce.pod: perl on WinCE (new)
      • perldgux.pod (new)
      • perlfreebsd.pod (new, surprisingly)
      • perlhurd.pod (not new, surprisingly)
      • perlirix.pod (new)
      • perlmint.pod
      • perlnetware.pod (new)
      • perlplan9.pod
      • perlqnx.pod
      • perltru64.pod
      • perluts.pod (new)
      Various OSes have their README files available with perldoc after installation now. I'd love to know what all these are (I know what most are), but some of them I've never heard of and will never use. I tried to note which ones were new (all the old ones were previously available as README.platform in the perl-5.6.1 source directory). Several of the README.platforms from 5.6.1 don't seem to have wound up in my installed PODs directory, like README.solaris and README.dos. I wonder what the pattern is.
      • perlcn.pod
      • perljp.pod
      • perlko.pod
      • perltw.pod
      These little gems seem to really mess up my GNOME terminals. I presume they have something to do with internationalization. There is little comprehensible text in them when viewed through perldoc.
    • perlintro.pod: new introductory guide to Perl by Kirrily "Skud." I've been seeing a need for this for awhile; great addition!
    • perliol.pod: C API for Perl's new IO layers
    • perlmodstyle.pod: Best practices for writing modules
    • perlothrtut.pod: tutorial for the old, deprecated threads. That must mean that...
    • perlthrtut.pod, which didn't show up on my diff, is a tutorial for the new threads. Hooray! Now I can go back and show up my distributed systems professor!
    • perlpacktut.pod: using binary data in Perl (pack)
    • perlpodspec.pod: the once and for all specification for POD, until it changes
    • perltooc.pod => perltootc.pod

      Mysteriously renamed, or else it's a mistake. See, if you people used CVS instead of that OTHER version control software, these kinds of things would never happen. Seriously, I can't see what this will do for us other than to confuse people on IRC when they are pointed to documentation they don't have. But I don't read p5p, so I'm sure there's a logical reason.

    • perluniintro.pod: now you finally know how to use all those great new unicode features that have been arriving since 5.6
    --
    J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
      • perltooc.pod => perltootc.pod

      • Mysteriously renamed, or else it's a mistake. See, if you people used CVS instead of that OTHER version control software, these kinds of things would never happen. Seriously, I can't see what this will do for us other than to confuse people on IRC when they are pointed to documentation they don't have. But I don't read p5p, so I'm sure there's a logical reason.

      To those who don't read p5p, all is revealed to those who use the great and powerful Google.

      I think you meant

      • I think you meant that the name was changed from:

        Yeah. :)

        this was done so as to not collide on the 8.3 filesystems with perltoot.pod.

        That's what I suspected, but no such changes seemed to have happened with any of the other long POD filenames, like perlthrtut.

        I don't read p5p, but I sometimes browse the archives. It's fun!

        Me too. :)

        --
        J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
        • >>this was done so as to not collide on the 8.3 filesystems with perltoot.pod.
          >
          >That's what I suspected, but no such changes seemed to have happened with any >of the other long POD filenames, like perlthrtut.

          On 8.3 filesystems where the OS doesn't compensate (Windows can compensate), filenames are simply truncated to fit. So perltootc.pod becomes perltoot.pod and you have a problem, one will usually overwrite the other. So the problem isn't with filenames being to long, it's with long fil
          • On 8.3 filesystems where the OS doesn't compensate[...]
            Which mythical OSes and filesystems would these be, then?

            I've always thought that the whole 8.3 issue is a red herring; Perl can't run on MS-DOS, and MS-DOS is one of the very few 8.3 filesystems left on the planet.

          • Perl 5.8.0 runs fine on DOS DJGPP. Read the perldelta.
    • perldelta explains the perltooc.

      If you didn't get perlsolaris, perldos, and so forth, something went wrong in your installation. I sure do get them. All README.$platform pods get installed as perl$platform.pod.

      If the README.{cn,jp,ko,tw} mess up your terminal, change your terminal. If your terminal would not wimp out, you would see the the first lines of the pod telling the Eastern Asian encoding they are in. After that, you need to know how to read Chinese/Japanese/Korean. I sure don't :-)

      Your CV

      • I hope my tone wasn't mistaken. There wasn't any criticism implied. Especially about CVS. In fact the CVS comment was a joke about CVS's abilities; the joke is that with CVS renaming a file is made so difficult that you would "never" have been able to rename the file. :)

        BTW, I thought you would be sleeping the whole release cycle off, now. :) Thanks for a job well done.

        --
        J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers
        • Well, in that particular feature CVS and Perforce suck equally.
          • Just for the record, in Perforce renaming is done like this:

            p4 integate -i oldfile newfile
            p4 delete oldfile
            p4 submit

            To rename directories, replace oldfile with oldpath/... and newfile to newpath/....

            Whether that sucks or not is largely a amtter of personal preference. :-)

            • Just for the record, in Perforce renaming is done like this:

              p4 integate -i oldfile newfile
              p4 delete oldfile
              p4 submit
              You mean, like, you can rename a file without shell access onto the repository? Using just the client? Wow - that's so cool. Now the CVS developers know that it can be done, I'm sure they'll be tripping over themselves to implement it. [Not :-(]
            • Renames should be atomic.