Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • It does certainly sound as if the time is right for finding somewhere else to spend your 7.4 daily hours of rest and recreation ;-)

    I now understand your earlier log on Stagnating Career [perl.org]. You have my deepest sympathy. I fear that I will be in your situation in the not to far future as the PHBs here are conviced that .Net is the owrlds greatest invention since the wheel and hot running water.

  • I once worked at a place like this. I didn't realize what a burden it was until I left.

    Run fast. Don't look back.
  • "Okay boss, you know how much it costs to fix a bug? If that bug is in code that's duplicated somewhere else in the system, double those costs. Don't forget to double the cost of actually finding the bug. If it's duplicated two other places in the system, triple the costs. Do that for every piece of duplicate code. That's the cost of not refactoring."

    • And the actual cost of bugs isn't even the cost of fixing them. It's the cost of them appearing, screwing things up for you and your customers, and the cost of cleaning up the mess. And then fixing the bug.

      Now, the cost of fixing the bug, not realizing there's a duplicate over there, ready to strike again...
      • Right.

        Now if you work in a place that would rather take the risk that bugs will not cost more than refactoring, brian has the right of it. You're better off working elsewhere, in the long term.