Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • Homeschooling one's children is a risky business at best. It's a very popular option here in Oregon and I know quite a few people who are homeschooled. One of them was giving a speech in college about how wonderful homeschooling was and how the stereotype that homeschoolers are not well socialized is rubbish. He pointed to himself as proof. In the question and answer period after the speech, no one touched on this topic because this individual was so inept socially that we were embarrassed for him. I a

  • I was home-schooled for two years. Mind you the years were primary education (3rd and 4th grade) and the situation dictated home school (only Americans on for 200 miles).

    I did well for it. I was already advanced in my education, thanks to great accelerated learning program. My bother and sister loved it as well. We got loads of one-on-one attention, and focused learning on our weak-spots.

    The down side was when we moved back to the States, and down-shifted to public school. We all suffered socialy for
  • The biggest argument for homeschooling is that the US public school system is almost totally inept at challenging students. The goal is to babysit and hopefully impart basic skills, not to educate.

    Case in point: In the US in the 50s and 60s, civics was a basic part of high school education. Being civic minded was important, as was a basic understanding of how government works. Today, civic mindedness is no longer part of the standard curriculum, and many if not most high school graduates don't know ho

    • We are homeschooling. Primary reason: we can offer better educational opportunities for our children that way. Second reason: most schools, public and private, are filled with undisciplined children and an overall unsafe, emotionally and psychologically, and sometimes physically, environment. Tertiary reason: I don't trust people I don't know with what they will try to tell my children (and even some people I *do* know).

      The primary reason might need some explanation: it is not so much that there are not
  • I'm from a different country (VERY different), and different culture.. but have you considered that the piece of paper/papers/high school diploma/what have you counts a bit in the real world ?

    See, its the difference between knowing the stuff and knowing that you know it, and having a piece of paper that says you know it. Yes, knowledge is important, but sometimes you get your foot in the door because of the piece of paper..

    Personally, I hated school. I still wouldnt swap any time, not a single minute of m

    • Thanks for the perspective. I do consider the piece of paper important. One concern I addressed with Sarah is that I consider grades more important than homeschoolers -- fortunately, she does, too. I think I'd like my kids to get GEDs [high school equivalency degrees] if they homeschool all the way through high school, just so they'd get that piece of paper. (Thanks for the reminder that I need to mention that to her.)

      One more thing about bad influences.. Your kids, IMNSHO, are going to meet bad infl

      --
      J. David works really hard, has a passion for writing good software, and knows many of the world's best Perl programmers