Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments
NOTE: use Perl; is on undef hiatus. You can read content, but you can't post it. More info will be forthcoming forthcomingly.

All the Perl that's Practical to Extract and Report

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 Full
 Abbreviated
 Hidden
More | Login | Reply
Loading... please wait.
  • I know a lot of Christians and not a one would support this country being a "theocracy".
    • Similarly, since when is Christianity (or "Christianism") remotely close to the "opposite" of civil liberties?

      In this country, anyway, every major step forward in civil liberties -- abolitionism, women's suffrage, civil rights in the 50s and 60s -- was at its root pushed for by Christians, and the tradition continues today, in the fight against abortion.

      I don't like the statue either, though, for a different reason: it denigrates the cross by putting it in a French statue. Just kidding. :-) Really, it doe
      • Besides the trolling, there's a point that I'm not sure I got: what does the statue means, for you? Given it's title, it's (for me) an allegory of liberty. But, liberty is an universal idea, that has probably been around since men exist, and that will probably continue to exist in all places and times... on the other hand, the cross is a symbol of a religion that is bound both in time (the Christian era) and in space (geographically), hence not universal (since the majority of the humanity doesn't care abou
        • Besides the trolling

          Are you implying *I* am trolling? Certainly, I am trolling no more than you are.

          there's a point that I'm not sure I got: what does the statue means, for you? Given it's title, it's (for me) an allegory of liberty. But, liberty is an universal idea, that has probably been around since men exist, and that will probably continue to exist in all places and times... on the other hand, the cross is a symbol of a religion that is bound both in time (the Christian era) and in space (geographic
          • Well, for the trolling, I was referring to your comments about the nationality of the sculptor, Bartholdi...

            And for the cross, I still have to disagree: even for Christians, it cannot be meant for everybody, since lots of people have died BC, jews and gentiles. I can't see how the cross can signify anything for a (for example) an average contemporary hinduist, but since I'm not Christian, it's normal our opinions differ on this...

            • Well, for the trolling, I was referring to your comments about the nationality of the sculptor, Bartholdi...

              Oh, that was an obvious joke, and I explicitly stated so. I don't consider that trolling. :-)

              And for the cross, I still have to disagree: even for Christians, it cannot be meant for everybody, since lots of people have died BC, jews and gentiles.

              I disagree. While it is true that at the most basic level, the cross refers to the death and subsequent resurrection of Christ, what the cross most symboliz